Surveys

Employee Satisfaction: How to Measure Employee Attitudes and Reduce Turnover

Employee Satisfaction:  How to Measure Employee Attitudes and Reduce Turnover

Most employers know that employee turnover is one of the highest costs they will incur. Hiring and training staff, service disruption, and customer service all end up suffering. Measuring employee attitudes and listening to their opinions can lead to lower turnover and increase your bottom line.

Here are some steps you can take to start exploring employee research.

1. Identify the key issues. What issues are most critical related to employee retention? Talk to upper and middle managers and uncover what is causing the most concern. These issues serve as the starting point for constructing the questions you'll be asking employees. 

2. Start talking to employees. Work with a cross-section of employees to learn what are the drivers of employee satisfaction. A focus group is a useful method for gathering this information.

Picking the Right Research Method

One of the most important choices in any research project is the methodology used to collect data. Every method has its strengths and weaknesses, and they are sometimes used together in a project.

Let's look at two of the most popular choices, surveys and focus groups. Surveys are composed of a series of questions used to gather opinions, thoughts, and feelings from a sample of the population. They are conducted over the phone, via email, and online. Focus groups are a gathering of 10-12 people who are asked about their perceptions and opinions during a session led by a trained moderator.

SURVEYS:

  • Quantitative—data is gathered using a quantitative (numerical) process.
  • Gathered from a statistically valid sample of your target market/population.
  • Help you identify trends, measure awareness, gauge satisfaction, and overall interest.
  • Are often used for benchmarking.
  • Can be conducted in-person, online, over the phone and by mail.

FOCUS GROUPS:

  • Qualitative—data is gathered using qualities or characteristics.
  • Good for in-depth questions.
  • Help you obtain information about motivations, perceptions, thoughts and ideas.
  • Allow you to easily test images, concepts, and campaigns.
  • Are most often conducted in-person.

Some projects require a mix of both quantitative and qualitative data in order to comprehensively meet your goals. Choosing the right method can mean success or failure, so choose wisely.

What If You Could Predict the Future?

It may sound like the plot of a science fiction novel, but what if you could predict the future? Better yet, what if you could read people’s minds? While you’re developing a new product or service wouldn’t it be incredible to know whether it will succeed or not? Getting inside your customer’s head and determining whether they will buy your product or service might seem like an impossible task but the creation of a customer scorecard, paired with marketing research, can yield the answers to your questions.  

Five Reasons You Should Take Surveys

You probably just got one in your e-mail inbox; or maybe the last time you stayed in a hotel; and that shopping site keeps asking you to do it now. I'm talking about taking a survey.
 

Why should you take time out of your busy day to respond to a survey? Here are a few great reasons:
 

Surveys Matter 

Surveys are used to make critical business decisions, improve customer service, and guide strategic direction. Your input is a valuable part of this process.
 

People Read Your Responses 

When you are asked to provide a response someone is typically taking the time to read that response. Open-ended questions are especially useful to marketers and research staff because we read your direct comments.
 

They Can't Change What They Don't Know 

A company can't make quality or customer service improvements if they don't know there is a problem. Your input (and those of anyone surveyed) help identify customer service issues that need addressing.
 

Good News Helps Too 

It's also helpful for companies to hear the good news as well as the bad. Offer praise when it's deserved so that extra efforts can be rewarded.
 

We Need Your Input 

Marketing researchers need your input. The more responses we have, the more conclusions we can draw. Your opinions really do matter!